Sign up to receive these weekly messages by email.



From the editor: April 10, 2015

Christ, the Power of God

Christ and Pilate

Remember how the Roman Governor of Judea, Pontius Pilate approved a military guard for a cemetery plot and how they took pains to seal the stone to permanently close the tomb of Jesus? That was Pilate's final word to Jesus, whom he had interrogated earlier that day. During that trial, Pilate and Jesus touched the third rail of worldly politics: Power. Pilate denied that power must be based on truth. Power was his to wield as he decided.

Jesus insisted on the primacy of Truth and that there was only one Power in the world: God's. All other power was either delegated or allowed until the time of judgment, which rested in the hands of no magistrate, no emperor, no Supreme Court, but in God Almighty. Pilate had no power over Jesus that had not been given to him. And Pilate had no power over the Tomb-although he thought otherwise.

Those wielding power may mistakenly forget about the primacy of truth. When Jesus was questioned by Caiaphas about his teachings, he said, "Why do you ask me? Ask those who have heard me, what I said to them; they know what I said." A soldier struck Jesus with his hand, saying, "Is that how you answer the High Priest?" The soldier used power, trying to coerce Jesus, who had noted that truth could be found in the testimony of others about him.

Jesus refused to give in, saying, "If I have spoken wrongly, bear witness to the wrong, but if I have spoken rightly, why do you strike me?" What could the soldier say in response? We are not told. Did Jesus' penetrating presence and words pierce the soldier's conscience?

When a truth is spoken to the consciences of those in power, one or the other must give way. Power must yield or truth must be silenced. Classic examples of this confrontation are the peaceful civil rights protests in the U.S. Power at first may seem to win the day-the state may whip, beat, imprison protesters and "restore order" and silence. But if the protesters speak truth to a power that is built on falsehood, they have the power of truth behind them. In the case of civil rights, the broader national conscience had to face the racism for what it was.

Many were willing to suffer to confront racism. In history, the state often does not back down and attempts to silence those who are dissident. It may even knowingly punish the innocent, as did Pilate.

In our current cultural crisis, those who speak truth to power about human life in the womb, the nature of marriage, and religious conscience are often targeted for silencing. Yet we, unlike the state, cannot use coercion in this conflict. Yes, there is power to be had in speaking the truth, just not in the way worldly men prefer to use it, like James and John who wanted to sit on thrones with Jesus. The power of Christians only comes through the Cross, through the willingness to suffer for the truth-and live according to it.

The power that raised Jesus was not meant as an assault on the guarding soldiers. They and the sealed stone were not the point. God did not unseal a tombstone to prove that he could empty a tomb. No, Jesus was raised because of a divine truth about the Incarnate Son of God: "It was not possible for him to be held by death." (Acts 2:24)

Power comes and goes. Truth is truth and stands forever. It cannot remain suppressed. Even the stones will cry out. Yes, stones, and even tombstones. "Suffered under Pontius Pilate" was never the end of the story. The gospel truth is that Jesus' name is above name, to which every knee will bow, even Pilate's.

Yours for Christ, Creed & Culture,

James M. Kushiner
Executive Director, The Fellowship of St. James